That time of year is fast approaching – once we celebrate Melbourne Cup – the wind down to the end of the year happens quite quickly. Christmas parties, end of year functions, and of course what often occurs within that time frame is our recollection of our past year.

How many of us look at the end of the year as a time to reflect on what we have done, both personally and at work and think perhaps we could have done better, perhaps we feel undervalued or perhaps we believe we did a fantastic job? Are there any areas we would like to change?

The pending new year tends to make us look at a number of personal issues. We’ve all been guilty of making new year resolutions – to lose weight, exercise more, spend more time with the kids, and we usually do all of these – usually for no more than three weeks then our life returns to our old ways of behaviour.

There are a number of questions we need to ask ourselves – is our job giving us the satisfaction we believe we deserve? Do we enjoy going to work every day? Are we working long hours for a reward that possibly does not reflect what we do? Has the role affected our family/work life balance?

This time of reflection can open a number of issues for us and it is not always reflected by the dollars. We need a lifestyle balance that is not driven by the almighty dollar. We certainly need to earn enough to keep food on our table and life, however, we spend so much of our time at work, – it’s important to enjoy it.

Statistics show that 37% percent of us work overtime for no extra pay. Therefore it makes sense to be in a role that we are happy in and enjoy going to work each day. For some, finding the right role can be a challenge and often it takes working for more than one employer to find this balance.

When seeking a new role, do a checklist of what you want and are willing to sacrifice. Promises of what we seek within a role can and made to you, often do not come to fruition. When applying for a new role, ensure it is a two way interview. Make sure the role you are applying for is a role you want, not just a role where the employer wants to hire you.

The days of security in the workforce have long gone. Typically a person stays no longer than 5- 7 years in one company and the days of spending a working lifetime within one company and being rewarded a gold watch at retirement have long gone.

Look at what the role is offering you and more importantly, is the company giving you the recognition you deserve. If it ticks most of the boxes on your checklist, then it is probably the right role. Just remember, this time of year gives us time to reflect on what we have been doing – do you checklist to ensure a change in your role is what you are really seeking. Christine Watson

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